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Othello/ Othello The Tragic Hero term paper 9700

The Main Characteristic of All Tragic Hero Examples

❶He allowed his jealousy to consume him. This question has already been asked and answered on eNotes.

Traditional Forms of Nemesis with Tragic Hero Examples For a Heroic Essay

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There are many undesirable traits in Othello, like his jealousy and gullibility. However, the core of these problems and his main tragic flaw is his insecurities. Othello being the only black character and an outsider in Venice brings upon many insecurities. Oh, curse of marriage That we can call these delicate creatures ours And not their appetites!

Iago was easily able to convince Othello that Desdemona has been unfaithful. What makes Othello a tragic hero is he experiences a tragic downfall. He treats his wife with little to no respect and eventually smothers her to death. Blow me about in winds, roast me in sulfur, Wash me in steep-down gulfs of liquid fire!

Othello trusts the wrong person and mistrusts those who are most loyal to him. In the play Othello, many of the characters have jealousy which is causing them to commit acts outside of their normal personalities. Iago, Emilia, Bianca, Roderigo and Othello all display jealousy throughout the play, though each finds resolution in a different way. The jealousy he experiences turns him insane with anger, and he loses all ability to see reasons.

Iago gradually leaks his poison into Othello and soon has the result he desires. Othello is overcome with jealousy. He accuses Desdemona of infidelity. Though Desdemona denies it, Othello is not convinced. Othello believes he has no other way to resolve his doubt than to murder Desdemona. The feeling of betrayal by Desdemona who he trusts is one of the most hurtful emotions Othello can feel. His jealousy turns into anger and he ends up killing himself and Desdemona. Jealousy is the major reason that causes Othello to become a tragic hero.

Another cause that leads Othello to be a downfall on hero is his insecurity. Othello is an outsider who is intelligent and confident in military matters but socially insecure. He leads an intense life, swinging between triumph and dread. Othello is different from those around him, due to his origins and his life history, but he shares their religion, values, and nationalism to Venice.

Beginning, then, with this passion, it is the art of Shakespeare to place his characters under those conditions that will show the true nature of their passion and develop it to its fullness and to its fated end. It is one of Shakespeare's supreme excellences that he realized that "every man is tempted when he is drawn away of his own lusts and enticed," and that every man's condemnation comes from the development of his own passions.

It was under the sway of this conception that Shakespeare brought Othello into his fatal conflict with Iago, for this drew from him all the hidden passion of his nature. To make Iago the sole cause of the tragedy that befell Othello is to seek outside the human heart for the causes of human failure. The wonder is that Coleridge, philosopher and genius that he was, could content himself with an explanation that does such violence to a true moral psychology.

But Coleridge may have had a personal interest in laying the blame outside the soul of the one who is overcome by weakness or by fate. Othello , like all of Shakespeare's plays, is a drama of character, not a drama of intrigue. But only a very careful study of the leading topics of the play will make this clear.

The attempt to solve the moral difficulties of Othello has never been given up entirely, though quite recently two distinguished critics have taken "the moralists" to task, and have appeared to think that the chief excellence of the drama is in its "moral enigma. They seem ready to reject alike what is common-place and common-sense. The names of these two eminent critics have carried more weight in some quarters than their theories have deserved, and some students have been too willing to give up the search for a true moral interpretation of the plays.

Others, however, dissatisfied with this complete moral scepticism of Shakespeare, and with this substitution of the critic's fancy for the poet's vision, have made attempts to find a larger moral meaning for the plays, and have tried to assign some kind of large spiritual principles in place of the plain moral principles it was thought necessary to abandon.

The suggestion has been made that in cases like that of Desdemona there is only an apparent defeat and nemesis, but that in reality there is a much higher spiritual vindication, and that the close of the play marks a complete spiritual triumph in which the human spirit remains "essentially unconquered.

But on the contrary there remains in each case, amid the very crash and vanishing of all earthly hope, a spirit that transcends common humanity as far as its suffering has transcended common experience, proving anew through poetry that the world of the senses is 'inferior to the soul. But, unfortunately, this kind of criticism makes a demand of us that no generation of theatre-goers or readers has ever been able to meet. To picture Othello and Desdemona as in the end not failing but actually triumphing, as Professor Alden finds himself obliged to maintain, is to think of them as in the same class as the suffering Job, and as Romeo and Juliet.

He says, "If the individual experience often seems to be at odds with everything but itself; if Job suffer for no reason such as can be stated in general terms; if Juliet and Romeo are the victims of the animosities of their parents The writer of "Job" explicitly declares that Job was a righteous man, and that his misfortunes were entirely due to the malignity of the evil one.

Neither were his misfortunes of the nature of moral catastrophes, as were those of Othello and Desdemona. In Shakespeare, as in the Bible, the misfortunes that are objective in their source are never moral in character. Romeo and Juliet were undoubtedly "the victims of the animosities of their parents," or in other words were the victims of social conditions for which they were personally in no way responsible.

About their misfortunes, however, there is not the slightest suggestion of retribution, and as Carlyle long ago observed, their apparent defeat is really a moral victory.

But it is very different with Othello and Desdemona, for there is an element of retribution in their misfortunes. The play explicitly depicts them as the authors of all the elements of their social conditions that give rise to their conflicts and subsequent misfortunes.

It should be remembered that Othello was not a son of Venice, but a foreigner, and moreover a foreigner of a different race and color, with all that means of divergence of mind and character.

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Looking at Othello as a Tragic Hero Essay example Words | 5 Pages. Looking at Othello as a Tragic Hero "Killing myself, to die upon a kiss." Othello's death brings a sense of justice to the play, one of the main forms and conventions of a tragedy. But if 'Othello' is a .

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Othello- a tragic hero essays Tragedy is defined as a drama or literary work in which the main character is brought to ruin or suffers extreme sorrow, especially as a consequence of a tragic flaw. This tragic flaw is inborn to the main character.

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Othello - The Tragic Hero Essay Words | 4 Pages. Othello: The Tragic Hero In William Shakespeare’s Othello, Othello is the tragic hero. He is a character of high stature who is destroyed by his surroundings, his own actions, and his fate. Othello is the one at fault for the terrible events in the play. In order to fully understand what a tragedy is one must understand the characteristics of what a tragedy and a tragic hero is according to Aristotle. Aristotle indicates that in order to be a tragic hero is not perfect; the character is fallible.

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Othello is a tragic hero because of his tragic flaw. There are many undesirable traits in Othello, like his jealousy and gullibility. However, the core of these problems and his main tragic flaw is his insecurities. Othello term papers (paper ) on Othello The Tragic Hero: Othello: The Tragic Hero In William Shakespeare s Othello, Othello is the tragic hero. He is a character of high stature who is destroyed by his s. Term paper